Foreign Law

The Perils of Rule 44.1

Late last month, Judge Malachy E. Mannion of the Middle District of Pennsylvania ruled on a motion for summary judgment in Epsilon-NDT Endustriyel Kontrol Sistemleri Sanayi VE Ticaret, A.S. (“Epsilon”) v. Powerrail Distribution, Inc. (“PowerRail”). From one perspective, this case is an unremarkable business dispute arising out of an international contract. But from another perspective,…

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How Do Federal Courts Determine Foreign Law?

Sarah Alsaden has recently published her research on how federal district judges are determining the content of foreign law. Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 44.1, a federal court’s determination of foreign law is a question of law (not of fact), and “[i]n determining foreign law, the court may consider any relevant material or source,…

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The U.S. Takes the Fight Against Bribery to Foreign Officials

American companies, U.S. issuers, and persons in the United States have long been barred from bribing foreign officials under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).  But until December 2023, no U.S. law directly penalized those foreign officials for soliciting or taking bribes.  With the enactment of the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act (FEPA), buried deep within…

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Latest Developments in Ecuadorian Toxic Tort Case

Since at least the early 1990s, Central and South American residents have been litigating in U.S. courts about their exposure to toxic pesticide called dibromochloropropane (“DBCP”). In the latest decision, Marquínez v. Dole Food Company, Judges Andrews in the District of Delaware held that a consolidated action on behalf of 65 Ecuadorian banana plant workers…

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Optionality in Choice of Law

Choice-of-law clauses are sometimes described as tools for reducing legal uncertainty. This characterization, while correct, is incomplete. In cases where the suit is brought in a jurisdiction other than the one named in the choice-of-law clause, it is sometimes more accurate to think of the clause as an option. Either litigant may, if it so…

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New Book on Foreign Law in Asia

Hart Publishing has just released an important new book on foreign law in Asia, edited by Kazuaki Nishioka. As regular TLB readers might recognize, I am very interested in how courts grapple with the law of foreign jurisdictions. (New paper coming soon!) In the United States, federal courts apply Federal Rule 44.1, under which foreign…

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Ingrid (Wuerth) Brunk

Vanderbilt Law School
ingrid.wuerth@vanderbilt.eduEmail

William Dodge

UC Davis School of Law
wsdodge@ucdavis.eduEmail

Maggie Gardner

Cornell Law School
mgardner@cornell.eduEmail

John F. Coyle

University of North Carolina School of Law
jfcoyle@email.unc.eduEmail

Zachary D. Clopton

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
zclopton@law.northwestern.eduEmail

Melissa Stewart

Georgetown University Law Center
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Matt Slovin

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Noah Buyon

Duke University School of Law
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Will Moon

University of Maryland
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William K. McGoughran

Vanderbilt Law School
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Chimène Keitner

UC Davis School of Law
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Catherine Amirfar

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
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Justin R. Rassi

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
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Isabelle Glimcher

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
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