Liability Waivers and Statutory Interpretation

In 1936, Congress passed a law to prevent companies in the business of transporting people across the ocean from writing liability waivers into their contracts. That law, currently codified at 46 U.S.C. 30527(a), reads as follows: The owner, master, manager, or agent of a vessel transporting passengers between ports in the United States, or between…

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Recent Posts

MCLE Program on Section 1782

On Thursday, July 25, at 4:00 pm Pacific Time, the Bar Association of San Francisco will present a virtual program on “Navigating Discovery Relating to Foreign Proceedings: A Deep Dive into 28 U.S.C. § 1782.” I will participate, along with David Wallach (King & Spalding) and Kendra Marvel (Jones Day). A flyer for the program…

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A Big Step Forward for Service by Email under the Hague Service Convention

The Special Commission on the practical operation of the Service, Evidence, and Access to Justice Conventions has just completed its 2024 meeting and, at last, taken on the issue of service by email under the Hague Service Convention. Its conclusions are welcome and should have a significant influence on U.S. courts’ decisions, which in recent…

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D.C. Circuit Revives Case by Former Saudi Official with Ties to U.S. Intelligence

Saudi Arabian Flag Next to U.S. Flag.

Dr. Saad Aljabri, a former Saudi official who lives in Canada, sued Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (“MBS”) and other defendants, alleging that they tracked him down and tried to kill him because of his relationship to the United States and to the former Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia.  As covered at TLB, federal district…

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Ninth Circuit Denies Rehearing En Banc in Cassirer

The legal saga surrounding the Cassirer family’s attempt to reclaim a Camille Pissarro painting seized by the Nazis has taken another step. Litigation in Cassirer v. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection Foundation has bounced among the Central District of California, the Ninth Circuit, the California Supreme Court, and the Supreme Court of the United States. (For more coverage…

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Victims of Hamas sue UNRWA

Victims of the October 7, 2023, attacks by Hamas have sued UNRWA USA, a Delaware non-profit that provides aid for Palestinians in Gaza. The case is one of several involving the war in Gaza, including one filed by residents of Gaza against the Biden administration and one brought by victims of Hamas against the National…

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Desperately Seeking Interlocutory Appeal

Despite some excellent opinions correctly interpreting the Hague Service Convention (HSC) and Rule 4(f)(3) in recent years, the district courts continue to be deeply divided on recurring questions of international service of process, in particular the permissibility of service by email or by other electronic means. Bill Dodge and I think such questions are clearly…

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What Does Overruling Chevron Mean for Transnational Litigation?

For the past forty years, under Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. Natural Resources Defense Council (1984), courts have deferred to an agency’s interpretation of a federal statute when the statute is ambiguous and the agency’s interpretation is reasonable. On June 28, 2024, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron. In Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo, the Court…

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Happy Fourth of July!

The editors at TLB wish you and yours a safe and happy Fourth of July.

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New Scholarship on State Laws Limiting the Activities of Foreigners

  States are important actors in U.S. foreign relations. TLB has, for example, covered New Jersey’s efforts to sanction Russia, Florida’s restrictions on alien ownership of property, and state court litigation on climate change, as well as state procedural law on forum non-conveniens and other topics. In the near term, litigation that challenges state regulation…

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