William Dodge

UC Davis School of Law

William Dodge

William S. Dodge (@ProfBillDodge) is Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law and John D. Ayer Chair in Business Law at the University of California, Davis, School of Law. He served as Counselor on International Law to the Legal Adviser at the U.S. Department of State from 2011 to 2012 and as Co-Reporter for the American Law Institute’s Restatement (Fourth) of Foreign Relations Law from 2012 to 2018. He is currently a member of the Department of State’s Advisory Committee on International Law and an Adviser for the American Law Institute’s Restatement (Third) of Conflict of Laws. Professor Dodge is the co-author of Transnational Litigation in a Nutshell (2d ed. 2021) and Transnational Business Problems (6th ed. 2019). His articles on international law and transnational litigation have appeared in journals such as the Columbia Law Review, the Harvard Law Review, and the Yale Law Journal.

Posts by William Dodge

Using TLB to Teach International Business Transactions

This post continues our series explaining how professors can use resources on TLB to teach various classes. Previous posts have discussed Transnational Litigation and Civil Procedure. This post discusses International Business Transactions (IBT). Although TLB focuses on litigation and IBT focuses on transactions, there is a great deal of overlap. The most obvious examples are…

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The Political Question Doctrine in the Lower Courts

Curt Bradley and Eric Posner have posted to SSRN a fascinating new paper about the political question doctrine. In The Real Political Question Doctrine, they take an empirical look at cases applying the doctrine in the lower federal courts since the Supreme Court’s 1962 decision in Baker v. Carr. Among other things, they find that…

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SDNY Rejects Service by Email on Chinese Companies

In Smart Study Co. v. Acuteye-US, a federal court in the Southern District of New York (Judge Gregory Woods) rejected service by email on Chinese companies in a trademark and copyright infringement case. China and the United States are parties to the Hague Service Convention. The court reasoned that the Convention precludes service by email,…

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