Maggie Gardner

Cornell Law School

Maggie Gardner

Maggie Gardner (@maggiekgardner) is a Professor of Law at Cornell Law School. She has served as an Associate Managing Editor for AJIL Unbound, as a co-chair for the Junior International Law Scholars Association, and as a fellow in the Appeals Chamber of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. Before entering academia, she worked as a litigation associate at WilmerHale LLP and clerked for federal appellate and district court judges. Her articles on international litigation in U.S. courts have been published in such journals as the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Virginia Law Review, NYU Law Review, and Stanford Law Review.

Posts by Maggie Gardner

Desperately Seeking Interlocutory Appeal

Despite some excellent opinions correctly interpreting the Hague Service Convention (HSC) and Rule 4(f)(3) in recent years, the district courts continue to be deeply divided on recurring questions of international service of process, in particular the permissibility of service by email or by other electronic means. Bill Dodge and I think such questions are clearly…

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A Primer on Personal Jurisdiction

Personal jurisdiction (or “authority to adjudicate”) refers to the authority of a court to make a binding determination with respect to a person or a thing. In personam jurisdiction refers to the authority to determine the rights or obligations of a person (including a business). In rem jurisdiction refers to the authority to determine ownership…

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New Article on Old Admiralty Discretion

The Notre Dame Law Review has just published my new article, “Admiralty, Abstention and the Allure of Old Cases.” The heart of the article is a description of the federal courts’ long-standing discretion to decline jurisdiction over admiralty disputes between foreign parties. Defendants in transnational cases have recently tried to invoke this old admiralty practice…

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