Admiralty

Cert Sought to Resolve Circuit Split on Anti-Suit Injunction Standard

The Supreme Court will consider a petition for cert to resolve a circuit split over when to issue antisuit injunctions.

Continue Reading

Drafting the Opinion in Great Lakes

Over the past six years, I have spent a lot of time thinking about choice-of-law clauses. I have written about how to interpret them, about their extraterritorial effect, about their history, and about why insurance companies frequently omit them from their policies. If a pub were ever to host a trivia night devoted to choice-of-law…

Continue Reading

Throwback Thursday: Eighty Years of Ex Parte Republic of Peru

Back in 1943, the Supreme Court issued its opinion in an admiralty case against the Ucayali, a Peruvian steamship. A Cuban company brought the in rem action in a federal district court in Louisiana alleging that the steamship violated a charter agreement by failing to carry a cargo of sugar from Peru to New York….

Continue Reading

Some Thoughts on Great Lakes Insurance SE v. Raiders Retreat Realty Co., LLC

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Great Lakes Insurance SE, Petitioner v. Raiders Retreat Realty Co., LLC during the 2023 Term. This case has the potential to change the way that federal courts evaluate the enforceability of choice-of-law clauses. Over the past few decades, these provisions have become ubiquitous. One study found…

Continue Reading

Admiralty’s Influence on Transnational Procedure

Admiralty was the original site of transnational litigation in U.S. courts. Given the breadth of admiralty jurisdiction, the federal courts developed a number of procedural tools for balancing international comity and practical concerns in these international business disputes. Just because a foreign ship showed up in a U.S. port, for instance, didn’t mean a U.S….

Continue Reading

Throwback Thursday: The Human Rights of Foreign Sailors

Litigation in U.S. courts involving gross misconduct committed outside the United States by non-U.S. actors did not begin with the revival of the Alien Tort Statute in the 1980s. In the earlier era of global trade that centered around maritime commerce, U.S. admiralty courts at times remedied—often with moral outrage—wrongs committed on the high seas….

Continue Reading

Throwback Thursday: Mason v. The Blaireau

Admiralty has always been a site of transnational litigation in the United States. From the earliest years of the Republic, the admiralty courts heard disputes brought by foreigners against foreigners over incidents that occurred outside the United States—cases that today might be derided as “foreign-cubed.” These “foreign-cubed” admiralty decisions are worth a fresh look because…

Continue Reading

Ingrid (Wuerth) Brunk

Vanderbilt Law School
ingrid.wuerth@vanderbilt.eduEmail

William Dodge

UC Davis School of Law
wsdodge@ucdavis.eduEmail

Maggie Gardner

Cornell Law School
mgardner@cornell.eduEmail

John F. Coyle

University of North Carolina School of Law
jfcoyle@email.unc.eduEmail

Zachary D. Clopton

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
zclopton@law.northwestern.eduEmail

Aaron D. Simowitz

Willamette University College of Law
Bio | Posts

Timothy D. Lytton

Georgia State University College of Law
Bio | Posts

Chukwuma Okoli

University of Birmingham
Bio | Posts

Abubakri Yekini

University of Manchester
Bio | Posts

Haley Anderson

University of California Berkeley
Bio | Posts

Brian D. Hulse

Davis Wright Tremaine LLP
Bio | Posts

Wenliang Zhang

Renmin University of China Law School
Bio | Posts

Haoxiang Ruan

Renmin University of China Law School
Bio | Posts

Melissa Kucinski

MKFL
Bio | Posts