Ingrid (Wuerth) Brunk

Recent Scholarship on Political Economy and the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act

Professor Maryam Jamshidi (@MsJamshidi) just published an article highlighting the relationship between capitalism and the law of foreign sovereign immunity, especially in the United States.  The article includes a detailed and rich account of current developments under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA). It comes as no surprise that the United States (and other global actors)…

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Throwback Thursday: The Ottoman Empire, the Capitulations, and War

Yes, the “capitulations” are often the stuff of very old books, the kind of books frequently discarded, the ones that you see heaped up sadly on the sidewalk in the rain next to libraries making space for people to surf the internet.  Books, that is, like Nasim Sousa’s, The Capitulatory Regime of Turkey: Its History,…

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Havlish Plaintiffs File a Potentially Misleading Brief Claiming Entitlement to Afghan Central Bank Assets

The 2021 return of the Taliban to power in Afghanistan has led to litigation in the United States over the assets of the Afghan Central Bank (“DAB”).  As I explained in an earlier post, an executive order by President Biden froze about $7.0 billion in DAB assets held in New York. A license from the…

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CVSG in Usoyan v. Turkey: Can Turkey Use Force in the United States to Protect Its President?

A violent clash in Washington, D.C. between Turkish security forces and protestors has led to civil litigation with interesting questions about the authority of foreign security details and the immunity to which foreign governments are entitled. Turkey has petitioned for certiorari, and the Supreme Court has shown an interest in the case by calling for…

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Throwback Thursday: Foreign Sovereign Immunity in 1970

A fascinating and obscure book from 1970 discusses the relationship between domestic and foreign state immunity, the power of the executive branch over immunity, reciprocity, and – of course – the legislative reforms that would several years later become the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act. The American Law of Sovereign Immunity, published in 1970 by Theodore…

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Afghan Central Bank Assets Should Be Immune in Cases against the Taliban

Victims of terrorist attacks who obtained default judgments against the Taliban have requested the turnover of Afghan central bank assets frozen by U.S. sanctions. Because these assets are protected by foreign sovereign immunity and because no exception to immunity is applicable, courts should not order the assets turned over to the judgement-creditor plaintiffs, despite the terrible injuries that they and their families have suffered.

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Recent Scholarship on Antisuit Injunctions

Giuseppe Colangelo and Valerio Torti have posted an interesting paper on antisuit injunctions in patent litigation. The paper helpfully surveys recent clusters of litigation in China, Europe, the United Kingdom, the United States and elsewhere. Especially notable is the growth both in antisuit injunctions against Chinese companies and in antisuit injunctions issued by Chinese courts…

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S.D.N.Y. Holds Consent-Based Personal Jurisdiction over the PLO Unconstitutional

Palestinian flag

The Southern District of New York recently held in Fuld v. Palestine Liberation Organization that a federal statute subjecting the Palestine Liberation Organization (“PLO”) to personal jurisdiction violates the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment. The case adds to a growing list of important due process questions in transnational litigation.

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Why Transnational Litigation?

The justiciability of Holocaust expropriation claims; treaty interpretation in international custody disputes; the adequacy of pleading the enslavement of children; accessing U.S. discovery for international arbitration; the availability of punitive damages for international terrorism; the immunity of international organizations before U.S. courts; how to serve process on a foreign state: The U.S. Supreme Court has…

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Ingrid (Wuerth) Brunk

Vanderbilt Law School
ingrid.wuerth@vanderbilt.eduEmail

William Dodge

UC Davis School of Law
wsdodge@ucdavis.eduEmail

Maggie Gardner

Cornell Law School
mgardner@cornell.eduEmail

John Coyle

University of North Carolina School of Law
jfcoyle@email.unc.eduEmail

Benjamin Hayward

Department of Business Law and Taxation, Monash Business School
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Rajat Lal

Faculty of Law, Monash University
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David Landau

Florida State University College of Law
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Matt Hornung

Cornell Law School
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Katie Burghardt Kramer

DGW Kramer LLP
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Tanya Monestier

University at Buffalo School of Law
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Jeanne Huang

University of Sydney Law School
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Mark Weidemaier

University of North Carolina School of Law
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Mitu Gulati

University of Virginia
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Pamela K. Bookman

Fordham University School of Law
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