Scholarship

How Do Federal Courts Determine Foreign Law?

Sarah Alsaden has recently published her research on how federal district judges are determining the content of foreign law. Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 44.1, a federal court’s determination of foreign law is a question of law (not of fact), and “[i]n determining foreign law, the court may consider any relevant material or source,…

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Zooming Out of Forum Non Conveniens

A recently published note in the Columbia Law Review, written by Christabel Narh, draws a connection between the federal courts’ technological learning curve during the pandemic and the future of forum non conveniens. Zooming Our Way Out of the Forum Non Conveniens Doctrine argues that the federal courts’ trial-by-fire with videoconferencing and remote litigation during…

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Two Conflicts Events in Oregon in May

Willamette University College of Law will be hosting two events, back to back, in May that may be of interest to TLB readers. Fifty Years in the Conflicts Vineyard On May 8-9, 2024, Willamette University College of Law and the Conflict of Laws Section of the Association of American Law Schools will hold a symposium…

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Important New Handbook on Extraterritoriality

Many TLB readers will share my excitement and appreciation for the brand-new Research Handbook on Extraterritoriality in International Law, a volume of wide-ranging expert analyses edited by Austen Parrish and Cedric Ryngaert. The volume explores extraterritoriality from a full range of perspectives rarely (if ever) brought together in one place. I am reading it cover-to-cover…

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Jia on the U.S.- China Rivalry

Mark Jia has posted an interesting new article on SSRN, American Law in the New Global Conflict.  It considers how China has shaped U.S. law historically and how the current rivalry between the U.S. and China will play out for domestic law.  The history is fascinating. It discusses not only the racist and xenophobic Chinese…

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Enforcing U.S. Securities Judgments Against Chinese Companies

Robin Hui Huang and Weixia Gu have an interesting paper up on SSRN about enforcing foreign securities judgments in China. In China’s Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Securities Judgments Against Overseas-Listed Chinese Companies, they note that private securities litigation against Chinese companies in U.S. courts is increasing. But most Chinese companies listed in the United…

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When Is International Law a Political Question?

In a provocative essay posted on SSRN, The Political Question Doctrine and International Law, TLB Advisor Curt Bradley looks at the historical relationship between the political question doctrine and international law, arguing that “the political question doctrine emerged in part to allow the political branches, rather than the courts, to make determinations about this country’s—and…

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“Sticky Beliefs” about Transnational Litigation

Empirical legal scholarship has been on the rise. But empirical research on transnational litigation remains relatively uncommon. This limits our knowledge of transnational litigation and, by hindering assessment of claims about transnational litigation, it allows what I call “sticky beliefs” to take hold. Sticky beliefs are assertions made without empirical support, which are then uncritically…

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New Scholarship on Sanctions and Central Bank Immunity

Ingrid has a new paper out on recent developments in central bank immunity, focusing on sanctions by the United States and other countries involving Russian, Afghan, and Venezuelan central bank assets and their relationship to immunity. Some of the issues addressed in the paper involve transnational litigation in U.S. courts, including the entitlement of sovereign…

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Visiting Judges at Home and Abroad

Readers may be familiar with phenomenon of visiting judges—where judges from one federal court sit by designation on a different federal court. These judges are typically restricted from holding any other office or sitting on foreign or international courts.  But after they leave they bench, they may do whatever they please.  The latest issue of…

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Ingrid (Wuerth) Brunk

Vanderbilt Law School
ingrid.wuerth@vanderbilt.eduEmail

William Dodge

UC Davis School of Law
wsdodge@ucdavis.eduEmail

Maggie Gardner

Cornell Law School
mgardner@cornell.eduEmail

John F. Coyle

University of North Carolina School of Law
jfcoyle@email.unc.eduEmail

Zachary D. Clopton

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
zclopton@law.northwestern.eduEmail

Matt Slovin

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Noah Buyon

Duke University School of Law
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Will Moon

University of Maryland
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William K. McGoughran

Vanderbilt Law School
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Chimène Keitner

UC Davis School of Law
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Catherine Amirfar

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
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Justin R. Rassi

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
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Isabelle Glimcher

Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
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Ben Köhler

Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law
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Aaron D. Simowitz

Willamette University College of Law
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