CISG

Optionality in Choice of Law

Choice-of-law clauses are sometimes described as tools for reducing legal uncertainty. This characterization, while correct, is incomplete. In cases where the suit is brought in a jurisdiction other than the one named in the choice-of-law clause, it is sometimes more accurate to think of the clause as an option. Either litigant may, if it so…

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The CISG and Choice-of-Law Clauses

Although the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) has been in force for over 35 years, there is still scholarly disagreement as to how this treaty interacts with choice-of-law clauses (see, e.g., the discussion on this blog: Coyle, Brand and Flechtner, Hayward and Lal). In principle, there seems to…

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Using TLB to Teach International Business Transactions

This post continues our series explaining how professors can use resources on TLB to teach various classes. This post discusses International Business Transactions (IBT). Although TLB focuses on litigation and IBT focuses on transactions, there is a great deal of overlap. The most obvious examples are contractual clauses that plan for dispute resolution, like forum…

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Drawing Inferences from CISG Opt-Outs

The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) and the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) both supply rules to govern contracts for the sale of goods. The UCC applies to purely domestic transactions. The CISG applies to many international transactions. When a contract involves the mixed sale of goods and services,…

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The Homeward Trend in Chinese Choice-of-Law Cases

One of the characteristics of transnational litigation is that there is generally more than one forum in which the suit may be brought. Although TLB focuses primarily on transnational litigation in U.S. courts, it can sometimes be useful to look at what is going on in other systems where litigation might instead be filed. A…

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CISG Opt-Outs and Ascertaining Party Intent: A Back-to-Basics Perspective

Two of this year’s contributions to Transnational Litigation Blog have addressed the intellectually stimulating but also practically pressing issue of identifying when, and how, commercial parties can exclude the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods from their international sales agreements. In Professor John Coyle’s CISG Opt-Outs and Party Intent, Professor…

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Rewarding Ignorance of the CISG: A Response to John Coyle

In a recent post, Professor John Coyle considers the interpretation of the following choice of law (“COL”) clause in an international contract for sale of goods where both parties are located in Contracting States to the U.N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG): “This Agreement shall be governed by the laws…

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CISG Opt-Outs and Party Intent

The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) is one of the most widely adopted commercial law treaties in the world. It functions as an “international” version of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) and, as such, provides the governing law for many cross-border agreements involving the sale…

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Ingrid (Wuerth) Brunk

Vanderbilt Law School
ingrid.wuerth@vanderbilt.eduEmail

William Dodge

UC Davis School of Law
wsdodge@ucdavis.eduEmail

Maggie Gardner

Cornell Law School
mgardner@cornell.eduEmail

John F. Coyle

University of North Carolina School of Law
jfcoyle@email.unc.eduEmail

Zachary D. Clopton

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
zclopton@law.northwestern.eduEmail

Melissa Kucinski

MKFL
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Cara Maines

NYU School of Law
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Andrew J. Coyner

Vanderbilt Law School
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Marc Tiernan

University of Amsterdam
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Poppy Alexander

Constantine Cannon
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Kelly Adams

Herbert Smith Freehills LLP
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Ben Köhler

Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law
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