Pamela K. Bookman

Fordham University School of Law

Pamela k Bookman

Pamela K. Bookman (@pamelabookman) is an Associate Professor of Law at Fordham University School of Law, where she teaches Civil Procedure, Contracts, and International Litigation and Arbitration. She is a member of several associations focused on transnational litigation, including the New York State Bar Association Task Force to Update Report on New York Law in International Matters and the New York City Bar Association’s Committee on International Commercial Dispute Resolution. Prior to entering academia, Professor Bookman was a Counsel in the New York office of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale & Dorr LLP, where she represented clients in complex commercial business disputes with a focus on transnational litigation and maintained an active pro bono practice. Following law school, Professor Bookman clerked for Judge Robert D. Sack of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, President Rosalyn Higgins and Judge Thomas Buergenthal of the International Court of Justice, and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the U.S. Supreme Court. Professor Bookman’s scholarship on transnational litigation has appeared or is forthcoming in the Stanford Law Review, the American Journal of International Law, the Yale Journal of International Law, and other leading law journals. Professor Bookman received her B.A. in Russian Literature from Yale University and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law, where she served as an Articles Editor on the Virginia Law Review and received the Rosenbloom Award for enhancing the academic experience of her fellow students.

Posts by Pamela K. Bookman

The Case of the Missing U.S. Judges: Traveling Judges on International Commercial Courts

In March, two sitting UK Supreme Court justices resigned from the Hong Kong Court of Appeals, citing the 2020 National Security Law, which had made their continued presence politically difficult for the UK government. Hong Kong’s highest court was established in 1997 to reassure foreign interests about the continuity of the common law and the…

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Where is the U.S. International Commercial Court?

Many countries have been setting up domestic courts devoted to international commercial disputes. Why hasn’t the United States? Perhaps because New York courts are already doing that work.

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